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$65 THE BIRDS OF HEAVEN, Peter Matthiessen, Hervill Press, London, 2001 1st UK edn., VG+ hardback, VG jacket, colour plates by by Robert Bateman

THE BIRDS OF HEAVEN, Peter Matthiessen, Hervill Press, London, 2001 1st UK edn., VG+ hardback, VG jacket, colour plates by by Robert Bateman Leading naturalist and writer Peter Matthiessen travels the globe in search of a prized-and vanishing-bird Cranes are ubiquitous in the earliest legends of the world's peoples, where they often figure as harbingers of heaven and omens of longevity and good fortune. They are still held sacred in many places, and for good reason. Their large size and need for wilderness habitat makes them an "umbrella species" whose wellbeing assures that of other creatures and of the ecosystem at large. Moreover, the enormous spans of their migrations are a symbol of, and stimulus to, international efforts at conservation. In The Birds of Heaven, Peter Matthiessen has woven together journeys in search of the fifteen species of cranes in Asia, Africa, Europe, North America, and Australia. As he tracks them (and their declining numbers) in the company of scientists, conservationists, and regional people encountered along the way, he captures the dilemmas of a planet in ecological crisis, and the deeper loss to humankind if these beautiful and imposing creatures are allowed to disappear. - Remarkable, much more than just a natural history and travel book $65

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$65 - THE BIRDS OF HEAVEN - MATTHIESSEN
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THE BIRDS OF HEAVEN, Peter Matthiessen, Hervill Press, London, 2001 1st UK edn., VG+ hardback, VG jacket, colour plates by  by Robert Bateman  Leading naturalist and writer Peter Matthiessen  travels the globe in search of a prized-and vanishing-bird Cranes are ubiquitous in the earliest legends of the world's peoples, where they often figure as harbingers of heaven and omens of longevity and good fortune. They are still held sacred in many places, and for good reason. Their large size and need for wilderness habitat makes them an "umbrella species" whose wellbeing assures that of other creatures and of the ecosystem at large. Moreover, the enormous spans of their migrations are a symbol of, and stimulus to, international efforts at conservation. In The Birds of Heaven, Peter Matthiessen has woven together journeys in search of the fifteen species of cranes in Asia, Africa, Europe, North America, and Australia. As he tracks them (and their declining numbers) in the company of scientists, conservationists, and regional people encountered along the way, he captures the dilemmas of a planet in ecological crisis, and the deeper loss to humankind if these beautiful and imposing creatures are allowed to disappear. - Remarkable, much more than just a natural history and  travel book $65